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Saturday, April 2, 2016

Definitive Answers


New weavers want definitive answers.  Unfortunately, usually the correct answer is...it depends.

Making cloth is not a straight forward linear process.  The factors that go into making suitable cloth for the intended purpose are varied and interdependent on each other.

For example, drape is dependent upon the fibre choice, how it has been prepared and spun (degree of twist), density and weave structure.

Wet finishing will depend again upon the fibre choice and materials since wool and linen (as an example) are wet finished differently.

The appearance of the cloth will depend upon the colour/texture of the yarns and the weave structure.

And so on.

One of the challenges with writing a book about weaving is that it is extremely difficult to present the information in a linear fashion.  This gets confusing and frustrating to people who think linearly.  But so far I have not found any way in which to logically present this information that will make sense to everyone.  

Therefore I know some people will be disappointed in my book because the material is going to jump around, back and forth, when they will want a straight line.

Unfortunately, no matter how I twist and turn my thoughts, no matter how logical I try to be, the above factors have to be weighed each against each other.  And that is a kind of messy organic blob, not a nice straight line narrative.

On the other hand, that is part of what makes weaving exciting for me and why I still learn something new all the time.  So many factors - so many ways to combine them.

4 comments:

garntrassel said...

Just as life - it all depends on... �� Good luck with you untangling work.

Stephanie S said...

The older I get the more I appreciate non-linear thinking.
Stephanie S.

Valerie said...

I think that's the major strength of Syne's rigid heddle book. She did an excellent job of organizing the content.

Nancy said...

It sounds like it may be time to create a flowchart :) I use these both at work to process creative talent into hard core production, and also for my guild - to create easy workflows. Maybe I'm a process junkie! Here's a link to some fun options that may be helpful to suss out the weaver's variables - http://mentalfloss.com/article/28052/10-funny-and-fabulous-flowcharts