If I taught a workshop/seminars at ANWG '19 would you be interested?

Sunday, November 15, 2009

Ashford Rigid Heddle Loom



Picked up my new Ashford Rigid Heddle loom last night and decided that, even though I have no time whatsoever to get it assembled and try it out right now, to at least open the box.

I'm glad I did because I wanted two each of the heddles, but didn't make myself clear when I ordered it. :( So I've ordered two more heddles, which will hopefully be here by the time we get back from Oliver, BC and Doug has time to put it together. (That's the part he likes about my being a weaver - he gets to play with the equipment.) :D

My friend is going out of business, so we talked about my taking over her Ashford dealership. If I'm going to start teaching weaving on rigid heddle looms, it would be really nice to be able to supply new weavers with their equipment.

So after wallowing around for a few years wondering what direction to take with my weaving, it looks like a path has opened in the forest. Since I've picked up spinning again, too, being an Ashford dealer might be a very good thing to do.

Anyway, I've asked for more details about what it takes to have a dealership, so we'll see.

Currently reading the Hald book on ancient textiles - as predicted, it's intriguing but not terribly enlightening. Sample, sample, sample!

14 comments:

Delighted Hands said...

Congrats on the new loom and dealership opportunities; you will still be enriching the lives of others in the realm of weaving, won't you!

Dorothy said...

Ashford have some great products, I love their inkle loom and just bought a 2nd hand Traveller spinning wheel. The spinning wheels are dependable and versatile. I haven't tired a rigid heddle loom, so look forward to reading about how you get on with this.

Laura said...

Well, I've avoided small looms since 1974, so this will be a brand new mental attitude for me, that's for sure! :D

With two heddles I can do things other than plain weave, although I seem to be stuck on pw regardless of loom right now. :^)

cheers,
Laura

Sandra Rude said...

Sounds like Doug and Mike have a lot in common. I think Mike is as excited about putting together the new jacquard as I am about weaving on it!

Laura said...

Nothing like living with an enabler - er - loom mechanic. :^)

Cheers,
Laura

Silky said...

I love to read your blog. My husband bought me an Ashford Joy. Its a lovely portable wheel.
It will be very interesting to me to see how you get on with the rigid heddle loom

WeaveZine said...

Dude, you've caught rigid-heddle fever! Woot!

Laura said...

Well, not quite - Doug looked at the loom and said it needed to be 'finished' first! Hopefully once we get home from Oliver Craft Fair........ :)

Cheers,
Laura

Peg in South Carolina said...

Wonderful news! I love your phrase, "brand new mental attitude." New beginnings, new growth, new weavers who will be so very lucky to benefit from not only all you have to offer but on seeing an accomplished weaver who finds new paths to explore.

Janet said...

Woo! Great minds think alike and all that. Have been toying with the idea of becoming an Ashford and/or Schacht dealer myself and opening a little shop with spinning and weaving supplies in my neck of the woods, particularly since becoming enamored of small RH looms myself. Will be very curious to hear how this all moves ahead for you!

Phiala said...

I'd love to hear more about your opinion of the Hald book. "Not enlightening" is not how I'd describe it. One of my students and I were discussing what books we'd want if stranded on a desert island, and that was #1 on both of our lists.

Phiala said...

Oh, and by the way: that's my Halloween icon - I just haven't changed it back yet. :)

Laura said...

By 'enlightening' I meant that there isn't a lot of info on how to actually *do* the textiles. Were the yarns blocked (wetted) before weaving? Were the fabrics significantly fulled?

Lots of intriguing info, but of course the only way to find out how to do it, is to *do* it. :)

So yes, I found the book fascinating but I'm just going to have to continue spinning yarn, hoping I'm doing it correctly, and then weave some samples....

Cheers,
Laura

Kerstin på Spinnhuset said...

Re: he Hald book: in some of the (slightly) more modern books, at least they give the # of twists per cm. In *no* arceological (sp?) book I've ever seen, they have given any hint of the grist of the yarn...
(We, too, can weave at (say) 10 ends per cm. The result would be Very Different if we used a 20/2 cotton or a 2/2 (nm) wool...)