If I taught a workshop/seminars at ANWG '19 would you be interested?

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Consistency


I know I yammer on and on about consistency, but it's true - you really do have to be consistent on just oh, so many levels in weaving.

One way to check for consistency of beat is to drape your cloth in front of a window and let the light shine through it.

Today there wasn't a lot of light by the time I finished weaving the scarves so this is a pretty pathetic photo which doesn't show how lovely the cloth really is.  I took it without a flash so that the light coming through the cloth would show the placement of the threads.

This cloth is a tiny bit challenging to weave.  First off, it's plain weave.  Remember plain weave?  The simple weave structure that is technically way more difficult than any other weave structure to get 'right'?  Secondly one of the warp yarns is quite textured and the two warp yarns are different in terms of their elasticity.  The beat itself isn't a 'beat' as such but more of a placement - a light kiss of the beater against the fell.

So I was curious to see how well I'd managed.  I think I did ok.  :)

(The different colours of green reflect the scene outside my window - my lawn, the street and the neighbour's lawn and tree - the tree is to the upper left and looks like a darker green blob.)

6 comments:

Andrew Kieran said...

Do you find that small irregularities in the beat can even themselves out once the cloth has been relaxed in wet-finishing?

Also, have you encountered "crows-footing" (you may call it something else) where a wool plain weave takes on an irregular pattern after wet-finishing due to not being kept at width during the agitation, resulting in uneven felting?

I had this problem myself this last year with college work. Otherwise everything was fine, but it's the first time i've encountered it, possibly due to not having wet-finished plain weave before as i have a preference for a 4 shaft twill

Sandra Rude said...

Love the texture you've gotten using 2 types of warp yarn.

Andrew, we call that effect "tracking" but "crows-foot" is equally descriptive of the result. It can happen with lots of different yarns, not necessarily just wool.

Sandra Rude said...

Love the texture you've gotten using 2 types of warp yarn.

Andrew, we call that effect "tracking" but "crows-foot" is equally descriptive of the result. It can happen with lots of different yarns, not necessarily just wool.

Laura Fry said...

Hi Andrew - Sandra is right - tracking - or crow's feet (love that!) happens in plain weave, most often with yarn that retains some of the twist energy. So long as it happens 'evenly' it adds an interesting texture.

cheers,
Laura

Alice said...

Great post. So true about plain weave. It takes a lifetime of weaving to learn that the simplest is the hardest.

Rhonda from Baddeck said...

That lovely green will be restful in the summer and brighten the winter. I love the subtle texture you obtained by mixing the yarns. It's a bonus that you reduced your stash, too!