If I taught a workshop/seminars at ANWG '19 would you be interested?

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Keeping Notes


from this...

to this....


It occured to me today that I have not begun to record the information for the Big Project samples.  Duh!  While I always think I'll remember, I never do, especially after a few warps have passed over the beam.

So I spent some time thinking about what sort of notes I need to record and how I'll go about doing that.  Some people devise spreadsheets or have elaborate notekeeping apps they use.  I'm a lot more basic than that.  I'll set up a new folder in Fiberworks to keep the drafts and then use Word for the notes.

Right now I'm just working on whatever sample is ready to weave given my inventory of yarns and other considerations.  For example, I need a couple of baby blankets for gifts and since a baby blanket project was on the list for the Big Project, plus I wanted to use up some of the yarn I had on hand, this is the result.

The photo also shows an example of warm/cool colours and how warm colours advance, cool colours recede.  Even though the ratio of warm (pink/orange) is the same as the cool (grey/blue) the pink/orange stripes look wider than the grey/blue.  Not only that, while the yarns are in fact flat on the beam, can you see the slight slant?  That the pink/orange part of the stripe looks higher than the grey/blue?

Since this warp is so wide I don't need such a long one but since I need 'extra' baby blankets I'm beaming 20 yards.  It won't get done before Christmas, but will be done before the new year. 

Monday I'll be at the press tackling that mound of wet finishing that is crying out to be dealt with and then I'll have a mountain of hemming to do. 

Currently reading Mystery in the Minster by Susanna Gregory

2 comments:

Sandra Rude said...

I love those visual tricks that color plays on us! This warp is a terrific example of the cool/warm effect. Can't wait to see the blankets.

DebbieB said...

How very interesting! That's a great example - I could see both effects you described.