If I taught a workshop/seminars at ANWG '19 would you be interested?

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Consequences



Painted warp scarf - rayon


Being of an analytical mind, I suppose one of the benefits is that I am able to sort through various choices (decisions) and follow them through to expected consequences.

I think this has made me the weaver I am.  Beginning with the idea or concept of a particular kind of textile, one that will perform a specific function, I am able to back track along the process to decide on how I want to get to my destination, as it were.

Choosing to have creative 'limitations' helps to guide me on the path enabling me to explore the parameters of making cloth that will work 'properly'.  In no way do I feel constrained or hindered in my creativity.  Rather I feel that creativity and a stated goal go hand in hand to get me to a good result.

Weaving is a long process.  Weaving by hand is slow, by any definition of the word.  People assume that because I can do it more quickly (efficiently) than they can, that somehow I must be missing out on the tactile satisfaction involved in weaving.  Not so.  I still wind each thread, dress the loom, thread and sley the warp, and every single pick is laid in by hand.  I just do it more efficiently than some.  That doesn't mean I take short cuts, hurry, or in any way lessen the satisfaction, joy, even, of the job.

Because for me it is a job.  It just happens to be a job that I love.  That gives me great satisfaction.  That I miss when I don't do it (like during recovery from health issues), that is a form of working meditation.  Weaving is something that I intend to do for as long as I can, yes, even into old(er) age!

The consequence of choosing weaving as a career has been multi-storied.  Yes, it has been, at times, frustrating.  There are aspects of being a professional weaver that aren't nearly as attractive as others.  But over all?  I have had a good life.  I have brought enjoyment to others through my own joy of making.  I have traveled further afield than I ever expected to do, met dozens, if not hundreds, of fascinating, quite wonderful people.

Bottom line?  A good life.  A very good life, indeed.

1 comment:

Kathy said...

Very well said, Laura. I think you hit the nail on the head for many of us.